From Today’s WSJ: Timing is Everything for Private Equity Firms

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From Today’s WSJ: Timing is Everything for Private Equity Firms

Having bought up $1.9 trillion of companies from 2005 to 2007, private owners will inevitably confront how to monetize their investments, what is so cynically called “the exit.”

The doors look barred. The mergers-and-acquisition markets have shut, as potential buyers wait for asset prices to decline. One can only hope that a mass of over leveraged and overpriced assets will stay out of public-investor portfolios. But don’t bet on it. There is too much inventory to move. If the IPO markets re-vitalize, will values be bloated for these assets?

Below is a video from the Wall Street Journal’s Dennis K. Berman explaining the challenge for these firms. No World Borders is still finding value in innovative companies as a sell-side representative for an Enterprise-class IT outsourcing firm targeted at SMB, and a leading Internet search marketing firm ranked in the top 15 among agencies and consulting firms in the U.S.

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By | 2017-05-04T04:07:17+00:00 February 27th, 2008|exit strategy, investment banking, investment capital, private equity|0 Comments

About the Author:

Michael is Managing Partner & CEO of No World Borders, a leading health care management and IT consulting firm. He leads a team that provides Cybersecurity best practices for healthcare clients, ICD-10 Consulting, Meaningful Use of Electronic Health Records. He advises legal teams as an expert witness in HIPAA Privacy and Security, medical coding and billing and usual and customary cost of care, the Affordable Care Act and benefits enrollment, white collar crime, False Claims Act, Anti-Kickback, Stark Law, Insurance Fraud, payor-provider disputes, and consults to venture capital and private equity firms on mHealth, Cloud Computing in Healthcare, and Software as a Service. He advises self-insured employers on cost of care and regulations. Arrigo was recently retained by the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) regarding a significant false claims act investigation. He has provided opinions on over $1 billion in health care claims and due diligence on over $4 billion in healthcare mergers and acquisitions. Education: UC Irvine – Economics and Computer Science, University of Southern California – Business, Stanford Medical School – Biomedical Informatics, Harvard Law School – Bioethics.

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